NJEDA to Launch Additional Financing Tool for Micro Businesses Next Month

Montclair, N.J. (May 5, 2022) – In celebration of National Small Business Week, the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) today announced plans to open applications for its Micro Business Loan next month, which will make additional funding resources available through the Authority’s Main Street Recovery Program. The NJEDA has already issued nearly $5.5 million in grants through the Main Street Recovery Program.

Governor Phil Murphy’s Fiscal Year 2023 budget proposal includes $50 million for the Main Street Recovery Program. The Governor visited East Side Mags, a comic book store in Montclair to highlight a business that has received this funding.

“Small businesses like East Side Mags are essential to New Jersey’s vibrant and thriving Main Streets,” said Governor Murphy. “As we transition from pandemic to endemic, we must continue to support small businesses as they recover from the devastating impact of COVID19. I am proud to support New Jersey’s small businesses and look forward to seeing their continued resiliency and contributions to our economy and communities.”

“During Governor Murphy’s tenure, we have made historic progress to spur economic growth and support small businesses dealing with the ongoing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said NJEDA Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan. “We’re already seeing the impact of the Main Street Recovery Program, as new businesses open their doors, hire new employees and move their local communities forward.”  

The Main Street Recovery Program is budgeted to provide $100 million to support the growth and success of small businesses in New Jersey. In just over six months, more than 200 small businesses have been approved for the Small Business Lease Grant and 32 small businesses have been approved for the Small Business Improvement Grant since February. The Small Business Lease Grant provides funding to help businesses who leased or expanded their commercial space in the last twelve months, while the Small Business Improvement Grant reimburses grantees for 50 percent of the cost of capital improvements, furniture, fixtures, and equipment at their facilities.

Realizing the need for access to flexible capital for the early-stage micro businesses the NJEDA will open applications for its Main Street Micro Business Loan in early June. The Main Street Micro Business Loan will offer forgivable working capital loans with a two-percent interest rate and no interest and no payments due for the first year. Eligible micro businesses in New Jersey with 10 or fewer full-time employees and no greater than $1.5 million in annual revenues will be able to apply for financing of up to $50,000. The Micro Business Loan will be available to for-profit, non-profit, and home-based businesses with a business location in New Jersey and that have been in operation for at least six months. Funding will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Seeking support for improvements, Kosher eatery Crunch Time was reimbursed through the Small Business Improvement Grant funding for improvements made to its facility prior to opening in mid-2020 to transform the eatery known for burgers, sandwiches, soups and more to the Lakewood community.

“We had a vision to transform an old bakery into a lively and attractive place for families to gather and share a meal,” said Crunch Time Owner Eliezer Kadoch. “We are grateful that funding from the NJEDA’s Small Business Improvement Grant was available to support our dream.”

Another success of support through NJEDA funding is Dreamweaver Equine Center, a non-profit in Ringoes which provides equine-assisted activities and social and emotional learning for individuals of all abilities and ages, starting as young as two years old. With support from the NJEDA’s Small Business Improvement Grant, the minority- and woman-owned nonprofit has increased accessibility throughout the property.

“When we opened our doors in 2020, we knew that people were looking for ways to stay connected while staying safe and having fun,” said Dreamweaver Equine Center Founder and Director Ali Cho. “Our family-friendly learning environment has been extremely well-received by the community, and we are so grateful. Improvements made to our facilities with support from the NJEDA will enable our farm to accommodate more individuals seeking opportunities to connect with our horses and farm critters, furthering our mission to promote mental health and wellness in Hunterdon County and all our surrounding communities.”

About the NJEDA

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) serves as the State’s principal agency for driving economic growth. The NJEDA is committed to making New Jersey a national model for inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents, and provide pathways to a stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the NJEDA creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness.

To learn more about state resources available to New Jersey entrepreneurs and early-stage companies, visit https://www.njeda.com and follow @NewJerseyEDA on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn.

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Important Update (June 2, 2022)

  • The deadline to submit proposals has been extended to June 27, 2022.

TRENTON, N.J. (May 2, 2022) – The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) today issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking insight from qualified entities with perspectives on the creation of a physical innovation center dedicated to financial technology (fintech) in New Jersey. The RFI seeks to collect information on whether a fintech strategic innovation center would create a unique opportunity for further economic development, sustain job growth and job creation, and catalyze innovation in the state. The RFI can be found at https://www.njeda.com/bidding/#OET. Responses are due by June 6, 2022.

The NJEDA is interested in receiving comments, questions, recommendations, facts, information, ideas, solutions, and responses that provide insight into the scope and characteristics of technology-driven financial innovation, generally referred to as fintech, and the potential value in creating a center for fintech activity in New Jersey.

Additionally, this RFI seeks to better understand the opportunities and challenges associated with establishing a fintech innovation center, including market need and gaps, potential sites and logistical considerations; information on potential projects or solutions that present the best return on investment and opportunity for sustainability; and national and international models that should be considered when developing a fintech innovation center.

“The creation of new innovation-centric spaces is an important element of Governor Murphy’s efforts to build New Jersey’s innovation economy,” said NJEDA Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan. “Gathering insights into how a fintech innovation center could contribute to the economic vitality and quality of life in the State will help us identify best practices and innovative ideas for developing a successful center that makes sense for New Jersey in terms of its long-term economic competitiveness.”

New Jersey is well on track to become the nation’s central location for the fintech industry, considering many of the world’s leading financial services companies have already located their back-office data and technology support operations in the Garden State. New Jersey offers a strategic location at the heart of the densely-populated and transit-connected Northeast Corridor, next to Philadelphia and New York City; it provides best-in-class digital infrastructure; it’s home to a highly-educated, skilled, and diverse workforce; and it serves as an international gateway with easy access to employees, clients, and customers across the globe.

The NJEDA is seeking responses from qualified entities including, but not limited to, finance and insurance companies, information technology companies, suppliers within the Financial Services and Technology supply chains (e.g., product and technology development), post-secondary educational institutions, relevant industry or trade groups, policy and academic researchers; real estate developers; business leaders, employers and entrepreneurs; technical assistance providers, and municipal or county governments.

Responses to the RFI are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EDT, on Monday, June 6, 2022, via e-mail to: FinTech@njeda.com.  The subject line of the e-mail should state: RFI Response-2022-RFI-OET-PFS-146 – New Jersey Financial Technology Innovation Center. 

All questions concerning this RFI must be submitted in writing no later than 11:59 p.m. EDT, on Monday, May 9, 2022, via e-mail to: FinTech@njeda.com. The subject line of the e-mail should state: QUESTIONS-2022-RFI-OET-PFS-146 – New Jersey Financial Technology Innovation Center. Answers to questions submitted will be publicly posted on the Authority’s website on or about Monday, May 23, 2022, at: https://www.njeda.com/Bidding-Opportunities-General/Economic-Transformation-RFIs as Addendum.

 
About NJEDA 


The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) serves as the State’s principal agency for driving economic growth. The NJEDA is committed to making New Jersey a national model for inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents, and provide pathways to a stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the NJEDA creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness. 

 
To learn more about NJEDA resources for businesses call NJEDA Customer Care at 609-858-6767 or visit https://www.njeda.com and follow @NewJerseyEDA on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn
  

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Authority Adopts Final List of 50 Communities that May Be Eligible for $240M in Food Desert Relief Act Funding


Trenton, N.J. (February 10, 2022) – The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) today announced that it approved the final list of New Jersey’s 50 designated Food Desert Communities during its Board meeting yesterday. Over the next several years, up to $240 million in funding through the Food Desert Relief Act will be available to strengthen food security and combat food deserts in these communities.

The Food Desert Relief Act is part of the Economic Recovery Act (ERA), signed into law by Governor Phil Murphy in January 2021. The Act directs the NJEDA to address the food security needs of communities across New Jersey by providing up to $40 million per year for six years in tax credits, loans, grants, and/or technical assistance to increase access to nutritious foods and develop new approaches to alleviate food deserts. The NJEDA expects to issue regulations later this year, a critical step in the development of any Food Desert Relief Act-related programs.

“New Jersey has long been at the forefront in the fight against food insecurity,” said Lt. Governor Sheila Oliver, who serves as the Commissioner of the Department of Community Affairs. “We have a moral duty to reduce food insecurity within our state’s borders and the programs we create under the Food Desert Relief Act will strengthen our ability to connect New Jerseyans in the 50 designated Food Desert Communities with access to much-needed nutritious food.”  

A January 2022 U.S. Census Bureau survey found that nearly one in 13 New Jersey households reported not having enough to eat in the past seven days. The total population of New Jerseyans residing in Food Desert Communities exceeds 1.5 million individuals across a diverse range of communities in all 21 of New Jersey’s counties.

Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin has been a vocal advocate of finding ways to eliminate food deserts and played a key role in the passage of the Food Desert Relief Act.

“The statistics surrounding food insecurity are sobering and unacceptable,” said Assembly Speaker Craig J. Coughlin. “By approving the designation of New Jersey’s Food Desert Communities, we are a crucial step closer to directly addressing the impact of food deserts on New Jersey communities and to securing access to fresh and nutritious foods, with real brick and mortar food retailers and neighborhood food service programs, so everyone feels the comfort of knowing where their next meal will come from.”  

The designation of Food Desert Communities approved yesterday includes consideration of factors such as: food retail environment, demographics, economic indicators, and health indicators. The NJEDA developed the list and accompanying methodology for designation of the Food Desert Communities in partnership with the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (NJDCA) and the New Jersey Department of Agriculture (NJDA), along with input from the New Jersey Department of Human Services (NJDHS) and New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH). The NJEDA issued a Request for Information (RFI) in March 2021 to solicit insight into food security challenges faced by communities across the Garden State, including specific obstacles and disparities within communities that are considered “food deserts.” The RFI also asked for feedback on specific criteria for the Food Desert Communities designation. The list was created based on feedback received through the RFI process and input compiled from research and from other public-sector organizations. The final list was revised to incorporate written and verbal input submitted by members of the public based on the draft list of Food Desert Communities released in January 2022.

“The level of engagement we saw throughout the public feedback process underscores the importance of bringing the issue of hunger out of the shadows,” said NJEDA Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan. “Under Governor Murphy’s leadership – and armed with one of the most comprehensive process and methodology for designating Food Desert Communities in the nation – we will continue to work with our sister agencies to create a robust suite of programs to address food insecurity in every county in our state.”

“Known the world over as the Garden State, New Jersey is currently home to over 10,000 farms,” said New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher. “We can, and must, leverage the ingenuity of our farmers and the resources made available through the Food Desert Relief Act to connect food insecure New Jerseyans with access to the fresh-grown fruits and vegetables produced at these farms.”   

Enrollment in nutrition assistance programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) were among the factors considered in the designation of the Food Desert Communities. Overseen by NJDHS, NJ SNAP served more than 900,000 New Jerseyans in 2021 and has provided more than $2 billion in extra food assistance since March 2020. NJ WIC, administered by NJDOH, served over 140,000 women and children between October 2020 and September 2021.

“The Murphy Administration is committed to combating food insecurity throughout New Jersey, and these new designations are a big step toward ensuring all residents – no matter their zip code – have access to healthy food,” Human Services Acting Commissioner Sarah Adelman said. “Healthy food promotes healthy living, and we look forward to continuing to work with the NJEDA to promote access to nutritional meals across New Jersey. We also urge anyone facing food insecurity to visit njhelps.org to see if they qualify for assistance.”

“This once is a lifetime pandemic has greatly exacerbated the issues of food insecurity in our state,” said Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli. “The whole-of-government approach will help us to provide the resources and supports our communities need to assist families in leading long, healthy lives.”

Today’s announcement also follows action taken yesterday by the NJEDA Board to create Phase 3 of the Authority’s Sustain & Serve NJ program. Sustain & Serve NJ supports New Jersey nonprofits combatting food insecurity by providing grants to organizations to purchase meals from local restaurants and distribute them for free to residents throughout the state. To ensure the program benefits New Jersey’s small restaurants, participating establishments must have 50 or fewer employees. To date the program has supported the purchase of nearly 3.2 million meals from over 400 restaurants. The NJEDA expects to open applications for Phase 3 of the program in early March.

The Food Desert Relief Act is part of the New Jersey Economic Recovery Act of 2021 signed into law by Governor Murphy in early 2021. In addition to the Food Desert Relief Act, the ERA creates a suite of programs that includes tax credits to incentivize job creation, new construction, and revitalization of brownfield properties; financial resources for small businesses; historic property reinvestment; new funding opportunities for early-stage companies in New Jersey; and support for the growing film and digital media industry. The NJEDA will continue to engage the public as new programs and rules are developed.

About the New Jersey Economic Development Authority

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) serves as the State’s principal agency for driving economic growth. The NJEDA is committed to making New Jersey a national model for inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents, and provide pathways to a stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the NJEDA creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness.

To learn more about NJEDA resources for businesses call NJEDA Customer Care at 609-858-6767 or visit https://www.njeda.com and follow @NewJerseyEDA on FacebookTwitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn.

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Program Provides Up to $75,000 to NJ Startups Furthering Clean Tech R&D in NJ

TRENTON, N.J. (January 24, 2022) – The New Jersey Commission on Science, Innovation and Technology (CSIT) opened applications today for the $1.5 million Round 2 of its Clean Tech Seed Grant Pilot Program. The program is designed to help accelerate development and innovation of clean technologies by furthering research and development (R&D) within the Garden State’s clean technology startup community. CSIT developed the program in coordination with the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (NJBPU) and the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA).  

The application for Round 2 of the Clean Tech Seed Grant Pilot Program can be found at: https://www.njeda.com/clean-tech-grant/. Applications will be accepted through March 21, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.

Similar to the inaugural round of the program, Round 2 of the Clean Tech Seed Grant Pilot Program will provide grants of up to $75,000 for R&D activities to very early-stage, New Jersey-based clean technology companies. These grants will help clean technology-focused businesses create proof-of-concepts and prototypes so the companies can more readily attract outside investors and, in some cases, begin to generate revenue. Specifically, the program will fund projects that are developing or testing clean technologies intended to recapture or avoid emissions of greenhouse gases and/or criteria pollutants, or to enable such avoidance or recapture. The following technology areas are eligible under the program: Chemicals/Advance Materials, Energy Distribution/Storage, Energy Efficiency, Energy Generation, Green Buildings, Transportation, Waste Processing, and Water and Agriculture.

CSIT will host an informational webinar, including a walk-through of the Clean Tech Seed Grant Program – Round 2 application on Wednesday, January 26, 2022.  Registration information can be found here. A recorded version of the webinar and copy of materials presented will be made available on the CSIT webpage following the event

This latest round offers double the amount of funding that was available in the initial round of the Clean Tech Seed Grant Pilot Program. CSIT awarded a total of nearly $750,000 to 10 companies statewide through the program’s first round last year. 

All applicants for the Clean Tech Seed Grant Program should be between a minimum technology development level of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 2 (applied research) and maximum of TRL 7 (full-scale, similar (prototypical) system demonstrated in relevant environment), based on the Department of Energy definitions. Applicants should use the tool included in the Technical Proposal attachment on the application portal to determine TRL score.

Additional eligibility criteria require that applicants:

  • Be authorized and in good standing to conduct business in New Jersey as evidenced by a New Jersey current New Jersey tax clearance certificate;
  • Have a minimum of one full-time equivalent employee (working 35 hrs. per week) including founders, with at least one employee working 50% of their time on the project being proposed;
  • Have 50 percent or more of the work of its employees, including founders and contractors conducted in NJ (calculated on a full-time equivalent basis – 35 hours per week);
  • Have 50 percent or more of employees including founders/contractors live or pay withholding taxes in NJ;
  • Have less than two million dollars ($2,000,000) in prior third-party funding over its lifetime (excluding government grants);
  • Have less than five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) in previous calendar year sales revenue.

Applications from businesses located in an Opportunity Zone-eligible census tract, minority- or woman-owned businesses or businesses with technology coming out of New Jersey universities are all eligible for bonus points with respect to the scoring criteria. At least one award will be reserved for an applicant that is a women-owned company as certified by the State of NJ and one award will be reserved for an applicant that is minority-owned as certified by the state of NJ.

About CSIT

In August 2018, Governor Murphy signed legislation re-establishing the former New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology as the CSIT. Comprised of representatives from the public and private sectors, as well as academia, the Commission is tasked with leading the way in promoting the state as a home for academic and technological research, development, and commercialization.


To learn more about state resources available to New Jersey entrepreneurs and early-stage companies, visit http://www.njeda.com/csit or follow @NewJerseyEDA on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

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Latest Funding Round Will Make up to $75,000 Available
to Companies Furthering Clean Tech R&D in NJ


TRENTON, N.J. (January 10, 2022) – The New Jersey Commission on Science, Innovation and Technology (CSIT) today announced that it will launch a $1.5 million Round 2 of its Clean Tech Seed Grant Pilot Program later this month. Funding awarded through the program helps accelerate development and innovation of clean technologies by furthering research and development (R&D) within the state’s clean technology startup community. CSIT developed the program in coordination with the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (NJBPU) and the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA).  The application will be available at http://www.njeda.com/csit beginning on January 24, 2022.  

The Clean Tech Seed Grant Pilot Program provides grants for R&D activities to very early-stage, New Jersey-based clean technology companies. These grants will help clean technology-focused businesses continue their work toward the proof of concept and prototyping stages, at which point they can more readily attract outside investors and, in some cases, begin to generate revenue. Specifically, the program will fund projects that are developing or testing clean technologies intended to recapture or avoid emissions of greenhouse gases and/or criteria pollutants, or to enable such avoidance or recapture. The following technology areas are eligible under the program: Chemicals/Advance Materials, Energy Distribution/Storage, Energy Efficiency, Energy Generation, Green Buildings, Transportation, Waste Processing, and Water and Agriculture.

This latest round offers double the amount of funding that was available in the initial round of the Clean Tech Seed Grant Pilot Program. CSIT awarded a total of nearly $750,000 to 10 companies statewide through the program’s first round last year. 

“Startups within New Jersey’s clean technology industry are impacting the world in immeasurable ways,” said CSIT Executive Director Judith Sheft. “During the last round, we received applications from a broad range of companies throughout this crucial sector and we look forward to supporting even more young companies as they work toward commercialization and enter the global marketplace.”

CSIT will host an informational webinar, including a walk-through of the Clean Tech Seed Grant Program – Round 2 application, on January 26, 2022.  Registration information can be found on the CSIT webpage. A recorded version of the webinar and copy of materials presented will be made available on the CSIT webpage following the event

Applications can be submitted starting on January 24, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. and will be accepted through March 21, 2022 at 5:00 p.m. Similar to the inaugural round of the program, qualified applicants can receive up to $75,000 in grants through Round 2 Clean Tech Seed Grant Pilot Program. The funding is being provided through NJBPU’s Clean Energy Program.

“NJBPU is proud to work with our partners at CSIT and the NJEDA to place money into the hands of the small businesses statewide helping to pave the way toward a clean energy future,” said NJBPU President Joseph L. Fiordaliso. “By providing this very early-stage funding, we are setting the foundation for these companies to flourish in the Garden State and to help us meet Governor Murphy’s goal of 100 percent clean energy by 2050.”

All applicants for the Clean Tech Seed Grant Program should be between a minimum technology development level of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 2 (applied research) and maximum of TRL 7 (full-scale, similar (prototypical) system demonstrated in relevant environment), based on the Department of Energy definitions. Applicants should use the tool included in the Technical Proposal attachment on the application portal to determine TRL score.

Additional eligibility criteria require that applicants:

  • Be authorized and in good standing to conduct business in New Jersey as evidenced by a New Jersey current New Jersey tax clearance certificate;
  • Have a minimum of one full-time equivalent employee (working 35 hrs. per week) including founders, with at least one employee working 50% of their time on the project being proposed;
  • Have 50 percent or more of the work of its employees, including founders and contractors conducted in NJ (calculated on a full-time equivalent basis – 35 hours per week);
  • Have 50 percent or more of employees including founders/contractors live or pay withholding taxes in NJ;
  • Have less than two million dollars ($2,000,000) in prior third-party funding over its lifetime (excluding government grants);
  • Have less than five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) in previous calendar year sales revenue.

Applications from businesses located in an Opportunity Zone-eligible census tract, minority- or woman-owned businesses or businesses with technology coming out of New Jersey universities are all eligible for bonus points with respect to the scoring criteria. At least one award will be reserved for an applicant that is a women-owned company as certified by the State of NJ and one award will be reserved for an applicant that is minority-owned as certified by the State of NJ.

Seventy percent of the awardees in the first round of the Clean Tech Seed Grant Program were businesses located in an Opportunity Zone-eligible census tract, minority- or woman-owned businesses, and/or businesses with technology coming out of New Jersey universities.

“Under Governor Murphy’s leadership, the state is taking a whole-of-government approach to creating an equitable green economy as we work toward his goal of making New Jersey 100 percent clean energy by 2050,” said NJEDA Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan. “Our robust suite of programs positions us to cultivate the growing number of clean technology companies within our state.”

In addition to the Clean Tech Seed Grant Program, Sullivan also cited New Jersey’s forthcoming Green Fund, the New Jersey Zero-Emission Incentive Program (NJZIP), and the Clean Tech R&D Voucher Program as initiatives designed to support early-stage companies in the clean technology sector.

In January 2020, Governor Murphy unveiled the state’s Energy Master Plan, which outlines key strategies to reach the Administration’s goal of 100 percent clean energy by 2050. In May 2018, Governor Murphy’s Executive Order No. 28 directed the NJBPU, in partnership with other state agencies, to develop this statewide clean energy plan and shift away from energy production that contributes to climate change. The Energy Master Plan laid out ways to fuel the clean technology economy through workforce training, investments in developing clean energy knowledge, and the growth of world-class R&D.

About CSIT

In August 2018, Governor Murphy signed legislation re-establishing the former New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology as the CSIT. Comprised of representatives from the public and private sectors, as well as academia, the Commission is tasked with leading the way in promoting the state as a home for academic and technological research, development, and commercialization.


About NJEDA

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) serves as the State’s principal agency for driving economic growth. The NJEDA is committed to making New Jersey a national model for inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents, and provide pathways to a stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the NJEDA creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness.

About NJBPU

NJBPU is a state agency and regulatory authority mandated to ensure safe, adequate and proper utility services at reasonable rates for New Jersey customers. Critical services regulated by NJBPU include natural gas, electricity, water, wastewater, telecommunications and cable television. The Board has general oversight and responsibility for monitoring utility service, responding to consumer complaints, and investigating utility accidents. To find out more about NJBPU, visit our website at www.nj.gov/bpu.


To learn more about state resources available to New Jersey entrepreneurs and early-stage companies, visit http://www.njeda.com/csit or follow @NewJerseyEDA on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

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TRENTON, N.J. (December 9, 2021) – The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) today released for public feedback a draft rule proposal for the Historic Property Reinvestment Program, as established under the New Jersey Economic Recovery Act of 2020 (ERA). The Historic Property Reinvestment Program is a $50 million competitive tax credit program to leverage the federal historic tax credit program to incentivize transformative rehabilitation projects of identified historic properties.

The program, which is capped at $300 million over six years, focuses on historic preservation as a component of community development. Awards of up to 40 percent of rehabilitation costs are available for qualified properties, up to a maximum of $4 million. Qualified properties in a Government Restricted Municipality or Qualified Incentive track may be eligible for up to 45 percent of rehabilitation costs, up to a maximum of $8 million.  Awards are scored on a competitive basis.

Members of the public are encouraged to review the preliminary rules and submit written feedback through an online form available on the Economic Recovery Act website. The NJEDA will also be hosting two listening sessions for public input on the draft rules.

“Governor Phil Murphy and the Legislature advanced the ERA with the goal of creating programs that prioritize equitable and inclusive development,” said NJEDA Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan. “The Historic Property Reinvestment program will do just that by ensuring that iconic New Jersey properties are renewed in a way that respects history while creating assets that support dynamic community development that enriches the lives of local residents.”

Draft Historic Property Reinvestment Program rules are available now for review here

Members of the public can also provide input during the NJEDA’s public listening sessions, which are scheduled for the following times:

Members of the media interested in attending the session or submitting questions are asked to email media@njeda.com.  

In addition to the Historic Property Reinvestment Program, the ERA creates a suite of programs that includes tax credits to incentivize job creation, new construction, and revitalization of brownfield properties; financial resources for small businesses; support for new supermarkets and healthy food retailers in food desert communities; new funding opportunities for early-stage companies in New Jersey; and support for the growing film and digital media industry. The NJEDA will continue to engage the public as new programs and rules are developed.

For more information and to provide written input on the design and implementation of Economic Recovery Act programs, visit https://www.njeda.com/economicrecoveryact/.

About the New Jersey Economic Development Authority

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) serves as the State’s principal agency for driving economic growth. The NJEDA is committed to making New Jersey a national model for inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents, and provide pathways to a stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the NJEDA creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness.

To learn more about NJEDA resources for businesses call NJEDA Customer Care at 609-858-6767 or visit https://www.njeda.com and follow @NewJerseyEDA on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

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Please be advised that a telephonic meeting of the New Jersey Economic Development Authority is scheduled for 10:00 AM, Wednesday, December 8, 2021.

The Members will convene to via conference call only.  Members of the public may participate in the meeting by calling in on the conference line.  Members of the public will have an opportunity to speak during the public comment segment of the meeting.

The following conference number is being provided:

CONFERENCE NAME: NJEDA BOARD MEETING (December 8, 2021)

PARTICIPANT DIAL-IN NUMBER: 877-692-8955

PARTICIPANT ACCESS CODE: 4204420

Members of the public are encouraged to call in prior to the time the meeting is scheduled to begin to avoid any delays. 

The agenda can be found 48 hours prior to the meeting on our website: https://www.njeda.com. The meeting will also be recorded and posted to the NJEDA website shortly after the conclusion of the meeting.

This latest version of The Economist’s Corner focuses on trends in New Jersey’s manufacturing sector. The report shows manufacturing in recent years is gaining an increased share of New Jersey’s economy following years of contraction. Moreover, recent trends towards job reshoring provide further impetus behind New Jersey’s manufacturing sector continuing to increase share of New Jersey’s dynamic economy.

New Jersey’s Manufacturing Sector: Industrial Vigor, as Viewed Through Four Charts

Manufacturing industry Gross State Product – Trending upward since 2018

Over the past four years, manufacturing has been one of New Jersey’s fastest expanding industries, growing at a 5.6 percent annualized pace. The strength has been concentrated in non-durable manufacturing – areas such as food and chemical products. This recent strength in manufacturing is quite a contrast to what the experience was in the aftermath of the 2008-09 recession, when manufacturing contracted at a 3.0% annualized rate through 2016.


Manufacturing, along with some other high value-added industries,
is increasing as a share of New Jersey’s economy

Not only is manufacturing expanding at a solid clip, but it is becoming an increasing share of New Jersey’s overall economy. This chart looks at how shares of GDP have changed since the period right before the pandemic to today. As the chart shows, manufacturing as a share of the economy has increased by approximately 0.5 percentage points. Manufacturing currently accounts for around 11.3 percent of private-sector GDP.


Labor market indicators and Federal Reserve surveys point to continued solid growth

Economists are always on the lookout for leading indicators that provide information on how economic activity is performing now and into the future. These next two charts do just that.

This is a chart of year-over-year changes in both the manufacturing index of hours worked and manufacturing GDP for New Jersey. The manufacturing index of hours worked is the product of the number of manufacturing employees and the hours they have worked. Essentially, it provides a measure of the amount of labor input in a given quarter. Given labor is a significant input in the manufacturing process, tracking labor output can tell us about manufacturing output. Here we see, through Q3, that manufacturing labor input continued to grow at very strong rate in line with manufacturing GDP near 10 percent year over year growth. Thus, manufacturing output continued to grow at a solid clip in Q3.

This chart shows data from two very useful surveys of manufacturing activity run by the Federal Reserve Banks of New York and Philadelphia. Here we are focused on indices for new orders, which is extremely helpful data for understanding near-term manufacturing activity because today’s orders become tomorrow’s production. Thus, when new orders are growing at a strong pace, it is a clear sign future production will, in turn, be strong.

In this context, anything above 0 indicates growth, so current levels near 20 signal double-digit growth. The one disclaimer is that it depends on whether demand is being filled by new production or previously produced inventories. However, given that inventories are stretched fairly thin currently, the ongoing growth of new orders signals a solid pace of manufacturing sector activity in Q4 and, likely, beyond.


A New Jersey Geography of Manufacturing Jobs, 2010-2019

This section provides an analysis of New Jersey residents who are manufacturing industry workers, as reported by the United States Census Bureau. The data presented here pertains to New Jersey residents and where they live, in contrast to where the manufacturing jobs or employers are located.

In the nine years just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic (2019 vs. 2010), New Jerseyans employed in manufacturing decreased from 396,000 (8.6 percent of the work force) in 2010 to 361,000 (7.7 percent of the work force) in 2019 — a 9.9 percent decrease in residents employed in manufacturing. However, there are some interesting trends throughout the state, including some places where the number of residents employed in manufacturing has increased. Moreover, as the analysis above shows, manufacturing in New Jersey in recent years is growing at a solid clip, which may reverse the shifts of the past nine years.

Top five municipalities in manufacturing worker residents in New Jersey,
by percentage of workforce, 2019 vs 2010

Looking at the raw numbers of residents in each municipality, the most populous cities unsurprisingly have the largest numbers of residents employed in manufacturing. The top five municipalities for manufacturing worker residents in 2010 included Paterson (9,884), Newark (9,327), Jersey City (7,953), Elizabeth (7,269), and Clifton (6,402). These rankings stayed mostly the same through 2019, except for the fifth spot, which switched from Clifton to neighboring Passaic. Clearly, the center of New Jersey manufacturing workers remains the northeast urban areas near New York City. The following map shows manufacturing worker density by municipality, both in levels and as a percent of labor force.


Map of manufacturing worker residents in New Jersey, levels and share of work force, 2019

Looking at the following map related to changes across the state, rural areas generally saw decreases in manufacturing employees. Whether this is caused by changes in manufacturing locations, movement of residents, or a combination of factors would need further study support. However, there is evidence from the 2020 Census that indicates rural communities are losing population.

Map of percent change in manufacturing worker
residents in New Jersey, 2019 vs 2010

Outside of the northeastern manufacturing area, there is a notable increase in manufacturing employees in Atlantic County and Southern Ocean County. It will be of interest to follow how New Jersey’s new wind port, which is being built in Salem County, supports further manufacturing sector employment in and around the region.

The towns that saw the biggest decreases in residents employed in manufacturing from 2010-2019 share some similarities to those above. Plainfield (-1,537), Newark (-1,441), Woodbridge (-1,431), and Linden (-1,265) are also in this concentrated northeast urban area, while Trenton (-1,341), which has the fourth most manufacturing residents in the state, is not.


Reshoring Jobs: a Pre-COVID Trend Accelerated by the Pandemic

Among the many lessons the world has learned from the COVID-19 pandemic is the is the vulnerability of the global supply chain. Estimates suggest the pandemic affected 98 percent of global supply chains.[1] Companies that had previously prioritized a lean supply chain model that prioritized cost reduction and just-in-time production were not well prepared for major worldwide disruptions.[2]

As a result of the pandemic, some firms started to consider “reshoring” – the practice of bringing manufacturing and services back to the United States from overseas.[3] A May/June 2020 survey of 750 North American manufacturing firms found that 69 percent were either “likely” or “extremely likely” to reshore their overseas operations.[4] It is worth noting that the pandemic did not seem to cause the sudden interest in reshoring – rather, it accelerated an existing trend.[5] Evidence shows, over the past decade, China has lost the most reshored U.S. jobs (40 percent), followed by Mexico (23 percent) and Canada (10 percent). Over the past several years, the number of jobs cumulatively reshored to the United States has increased from about 100,000 in 2013 to over 500,000 in 2020.[6] In 2020, reshoring logged a record high 109,000 jobs announced.

The pandemic was the main driver of this recent surge, but analysts also view this landmark development as a combination of other factors, including greater U.S. competitiveness due to corporate tax and regulatory cuts, and rising concern over China’s competitiveness.[7] In general, a number of variables unrelated to the pandemic factor into a company’s decision to reshore. Rising wages in hosting countries are one of the most frequently cited reasons. Other reasons include protection of intellectual property, shorter supply chains, and the value of the “Made in USA” label as factors in decisions resulting in reshoring.[8] Despite the impact of COVID-19 and some promising developments in recent years, it’s important not to assume that reshoring is inevitable. Decisions on supply chains are made based on business fundamentals such as production costs and access to large markets. COVID-19 will likely not significantly affect those factors.


[1] https://www.supplychaindive.com/news/supply-chains-reshoring-decisions-sourcing-manufacturing-china/597596/

[2] https://www.brookings.edu/research/reshoring-advanced-manufacturing-supply-chains-to-generate-good-jobs/

[3] https://www.brookings.edu/research/reshoring-advanced-manufacturing-supply-chains-to-generate-good-jobs/

[4] https://www.areadevelopment.com/BusinessGlobalization/Q1-2021/job-creation-through-reshoring.shtml

[5] https://www.areadevelopment.com/BusinessGlobalization/Q1-2021/job-creation-through-reshoring.shtml

[6] Reshoring Initiative 2020 Data Report

[7] Ibid

[8] https://www.areadevelopment.com/BusinessGlobalization/Q1-2021/job-creation-through-reshoring.shtml; https://www.supplychaindive.com/news/supply-chains-reshoring-decisions-sourcing-manufacturing-china/597596/

 $20M Expansion to Pilot Program Helps Jersey Shore Businesses &
Organizations Purchase Zero-Emission Medium-Duty Vehicles

TRENTON, N.J. (December 1, 2021) – The New Jersey Economic Development Authority today opened applications for its popular New Jersey Zero Emission Incentive Program (NJ ZIP) pilot to businesses and organizations in the Greater Shore Area to help them offset the cost of purchasing new, zero-emission medium-duty vehicles (MDVs). Last month, the NJEDA Board approved a $20 million expansion of the program funding pool, which builds on momentum generated since the launch of the clean energy initiative. NJ ZIP is also available to entities in the greater Newark, Camden, and New Brunswick areas.

With this expansion, nearly $45 million has been allocated to the voucher pool. Applications are being accepted on a rolling basis and can found at http://www.njeda.com/njzip. The website also includes links to useful resources for potential program applicants, including: webinars for vendors and purchasers, eligibility requirements, frequently asked questions, accounting of remaining funds, and a link to email the NJ ZIP program manager directly.

Businesses and organizations in the four designated greater community areas can apply for vouchers to purchase new, Class 2b to Class 6 zero-emission MDVs. The size of vouchers awarded through the program varies depending on the class of vehicle being purchased, from a minimum of $25,000 for Class 2b vehicles to $100,000 for Class 6 vehicles. Bonuses are available for small businesses (fewer than 25 staff or less than $5 million in annual revenues); women-, minority-, and veteran-owned businesses; vehicles that are manufactured in New Jersey; and small businesses that scrap their eligible MHDVs. More information on eligibility and processes is available at https://www.njeda.com/njzip.

“Our shore communities have repeatedly experienced the long-term impacts of climate change over the last decade and it is incumbent upon us to continue to create and leverage innovative solutions to blunt these effects,” NJEDA Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan said. “NJ ZIP sits at the intersection of clean energy and environmental justice and is a vital part of Governor Phil Murphy’s whole-of-government approach to combating climate change and spurring economic opportunities in historically overburdened communities.”

For the purposes of this pilot expansion, the Greater Shore Area is defined as the overburdened communities within or intersected by a line set at a 10-mile distance from New Jersey’s eastern Atlantic shore, spanning approximately from Sandy Hook Bay to Delaware Bay. This includes the following municipalities:

Absecon, Asbury Park, Atlantic City, Barnegat Township, Berkeley Township, Bradley Beach Borough, Brick Township, Brigantine, Cape May, Colts Neck Township, Eatontown Borough, Egg Harbor City, Egg Harbor Township, Farmingdale Borough, Galloway Township, Highlands Borough, Holmdel Township, Howell Township, Keansburg Borough, Keyport Borough, Lacey Township, Lakewood Township, Little Egg Harbor Township, Long Branch, Lower Township, Manchester Township, Middle Township, Middletown Township, Neptune City Borough, Neptune Township, North Wildwood, Northfield, Ocean City, Ocean Gate Borough, Ocean Township, Pleasantville, Point Pleasant Beach Borough, Red Bank Borough, Seaside Heights Borough, Shrewsbury Township, Somers Point, South Toms River Borough, Stafford Township, Tinton Falls Borough, Toms River Township, Tuckerton Borough, Union Beach Borough, Ventnor City, Wildwood, Woodbine Borough

Vouchers are available on a first-come, first-served basis, with set-asides for the Greater Shore Areas, small- and micro-businesses, and passenger transportation. Based on the continued positive results of this expansion of the pilot program, additional expansions or a longer-term program with expanded eligibility may be proposed.

This latest NJ ZIP expansion is being funded using proceeds from New Jersey’s participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a multi-state “cap-and-trade” program regulating carbon dioxide emissions, that New Jersey was rejoined by Executive Order of Governor Murphy in 2019. More information about New Jersey’s plans for using RGGI funding is available https://www.nj.gov/rggi/index.html.


About the New Jersey Economic Development Authority

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) serves as the State’s principal agency for driving economic growth. The NJEDA is committed to making New Jersey a national model for inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents, and provide pathways to a stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the NJEDA creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness.

To learn more about NJEDA resources for businesses call NJEDA Customer Care at 609-858-6767 or visit https://www.njeda.com and follow @NewJerseyEDA on FacebookTwitterInstagramand LinkedIn.

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TRENTON, N.J. (November 23, 2021) – Holiday shopping presents many opportunities to show your support for locally-owned businesses in New Jersey. With close to one million small businesses that call the Garden State their home, the support we show our small business owners during the holidays will have a more far-reaching effect than you may anticipate.

When you consider that according to the U.S. Small Business Administration, there are 937,436 small businesses in New Jersey that employ around 1.9 million people, which  translates to half of all employees in the State, you can begin to understand the monetary impact small businesses bring to our economy. Three times more money returns to the local economy when you shop locally, while eating at locally-owned restaurants brings in two times more money, according to a series of independent-business impact studies conducted by Civic Economics, a consulting firm for local businesses.

To date, in line with Governor Phil Murphy’s vision for a strong recovery, the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) has approved 92,300 grants, loans, guarantees of loans, and technical assistance totaling nearly $667 million through COVID-19 relief programs.  Of that, more than 77,790 grants totaling over $589 million have been awarded.

“In support of Governor Murphy’s goal of a stronger, fairer New Jersey economy, the NJEDA developed numerous programs and services to help our small businesses effectively navigate the economic difficulties caused by the pandemic,” said NJEDA Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan. “When small business owners have the local support, on top of any federal or state resources they might be eligible for, the light at the end of the tunnel becomes much brighter, not just for that business, but for the entire community.”

Sullivan added that in order to ensure equitable and inclusive distribution of support, one-third of grant funding approved has been for businesses in the 715 census tracts deemed eligible for consideration as Opportunity Zones.

“Minority- and women-owned businesses were impacted particularly hard by the pandemic, and the holidays are a great time to show our support,” said NJEDA’s Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Michelle Bodden. “COVID-19 exacerbated the existing challenges faced by businesses owned by people of color, and an equitable and successful recovery is imperative to the economic future of all New Jersey families.”

Bodden noted that outreach efforts for almost all the Authority’s COVID-19 relief programs targeted minority- and women-owned businesses as well as businesses in historically marginalized communities. As a result of these efforts, nearly 30 percent of the grant funding the NJEDA made available to COVID-19-impacted businesses went to women- and/or minority-owned small businesses.

Whether you decide to shop in one of your town’s many small businesses or opt to hit the road and visit your favorite New Jersey small-town vacation destination, shopping locally during Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday will prove to be of vital importance to our local economies, as the money you spend at these brick-and-mortar, mom-and-pop shops, will in turn support the communities they serve in several ways.

When small business owners use their earnings to pay for the local products and services they need, that money continues to circulate within the community. By shopping local, you are not just supporting small business owners, you str also supporting their families, their employees and their employees’ families. Additionally, a portion of the taxes charged on your purchases helps fund local police and fire departments, build and improve your schools, and keep roads and bridges in good condition. Therefore, shopping locally also benefits local facilities and municipalities.

The NJEDA’s support for small businesses in the state has not been limited to financial relief program. The Authority has also provided funding to create the E-Commerce Technical Assistance program services to help businesses operate safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. In July of 2020, the Authority engaged the services of Hudson IntegratedPositive Solutions, and Suasion Communications Group to help businesses that normally rely on foot traffic and in-person transactions identify and implement the website and ecommerce capabilities they need to stay in business while complying with health guidelines and changing customer preferences. Through support from this program, more than 60 New Jersey businesses have pivoted to expand their online capabilities, which has helped them continue to serve their customers throughout the pandemic, and also capitalize on opportunities to reach more customers, such as Cyber Monday.

Another NJEDA program that has received high praise for the positive impact it’s had on struggling communities is Sustain and Serve NJ. The program provides eligible entities with grants of between $100,000 to $2 million to support the purchase of meals from New Jersey-based restaurants that have been negatively impacted by COVID-19. So far, $34 million has been awarded to 29 organizations throughout the state to partner with over 400 restaurants and meal delivery services in all 21 counties. Governor Murphy announced another $10 million for the program earlier this month. Sustain and Serve NJ is now on track to provide more than 4.5 million meals.

Some programs created under the Main Street Recovery Program, established under the New Jersey Economic Recovery Act of 2020 (ERA), signed into law by Governor Murphy on January 7, 2021, are designed to assist growing small businesses. This includes the recently-launched Small Business Lease Grant, which offers reimbursement of a percentage of annual lease payments to for profit businesses and non-profit organizations in eligible areas that plan to lease between 500 – 5,000 square feet of new or additional market-rate, first-floor office, industrial or retail space for a minimum five-year term. A sister program, the Small Business Improvement Grant, will offer reimbursement for costs associated with making building improvements or purchasing new furniture, fixtures and equipment.

The NJEDA’s Board also recently approved the creation of the Main Street Micro Business Loan, which will provide financing of up to $50,000 to eligible micro businesses in New Jersey with ten or fewer full-time employees and no greater than $1.5 million in annual revenues.  The Program is the successor to the Micro Business Loan Program established by the NJEDA in 2019.

New Jersey keeps making huge strides in its efforts to attract entrepreneurs from all sectors of the economy who see the state as an ideal place to start a business. Trenton’s pro-business approach and a growing state economy have made this possible. Nevertheless, the support small business owners need to see their business thrive comes from members of its own community and this holiday season gives us all a great opportunity to show that support.

Our small businesses are counting on you this holiday season! Remember, #NJShopsLocal!

About the New Jersey Economic Development Authority

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) serves as the State’s principal agency for driving economic growth. The NJEDA is committed to making New Jersey a national model for inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents, and provide pathways to a stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the NJEDA creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness.
 
To learn more about NJEDA resources for businesses call NJEDA Customer Care at 609-858-6767 or visit https://www.njeda.com and follow @NewJerseyEDA on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Instagram.
 

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